• Gold now has limited downside (20%) but substantial upside (650%)
  • Gains on gold are likely to come at a time when stocks are crashing
  • Investors and savers without an allocation to gold will be wiped out
  • Time to consider saving in physical gold? Editors note

by James Rickards, Daily Reckoning

Following the Panic of 1907, John Pierpont Morgan was called to testify before Congress in 1912 on the subject of Wall Street manipulations and what was then called the “money trust” or banking monopoly of J. P. Morgan & Co.

Source: Quotefancy

In the course of his testimony, Morgan made one of the most profound and lasting remarks in the history of finance. In reply to questions from the congressional committee staff attorney, Samuel Untermyer, the following dialogue ensued as recorded in the Congressional Record:

UntermyerI want to ask you a few questions bearing on the subject that you have touched upon this morning, as to the control of money. The control of credit involves a control of money, does it not?

MorganA control of credit? No.

UntermyerBut the basis of banking is credit, is it not?

MorganNot always. That is an evidence of banking, but it is not the money itself. Money is gold, and nothing else.

Morgan’s observation that “Money is gold, and nothing else,” was right in two respects. The first and most obvious is that gold is a form of money. The second and more subtle point, revealed in the phrase, “and nothing else,” was that other instruments purporting to be money were really forms of credit unless they were redeemable into physical gold.

My readers know that I am a big proponent of gold. We should all be mindful of Morgan’s admonition, and not lose sight of the way in which real wealth is preserved through manias, panics and crashes.

Today I’ll provide an overview on why I recommend gold in every portfolio, and why gold may be the best performing asset class in the years ahead.

Specifically, my intermediate term forecast is that gold will reach $10,000 per ounce in the course of the current bull market that began in December 2015. I recommend that investors keep 10% of their investable assets in physical gold (with room left in the portfolio for “paper gold” in the form of ETFs and mining stocks).

Here’s the analysis:

We begin with the 10% allocation. The first step is to determine “investable assets.” This is not the same as net worth. You should exclude your home equity, business equity and any other illiquid or intangible assets that constitute your livelihood. Do not take portfolio market risk with your livelihood or the roof over your head. Once you’ve removed those assets, whatever is left are your “investable assets.” You should allocate 10% of that amount to physical gold.

PLACEHOLDER

Jim Rickards in a vault near Zurich, Switzerland during a recent visit. The pallet in front of him has $25 million in gold bars arrayed.

This gold should not be kept in a bank safe deposit box or bank vault. There is a high correlation between the time you’ll want your gold the most and the time banks will be closed by government order. Keep your gold in safe, non-bank storage.

The next part of the analysis concerns my $10,000 per ounce forecast for the dollar price of gold. This is straightforward.

Excessive Federal Reserve money printing from 2008–2015 combined with projected U.S. government deficits over $1 trillion per year for the foreseeable future, and a U.S. debt-to-deficit ratio of 105% rising to over 110% in a few years, leave the U.S. dollar extremely vulnerable to a collapse of confidence on the part of foreign investors and U.S. citizens alike.

That collapse of confidence will not happen in a vacuum. It will coincide with a more general loss of confidence in all major central banks and reserve currencies. This loss of confidence will be exacerbated by malicious efforts on the part of Russia, China, Turkey, Iran and others to abandon dollars entirely and to bypass the U.S. dollar payments system.

The evolution of oil pricing from dollars to IMFs special drawing rights, SDRs, will be the last nail in the dollar’s coffin. All of these trends are well underway now, but could climax quickly into a general loss of confidence in the dollar.

At that point, either the U.S. acting on its own or a global conference resembling a new Bretton Woods will turn to gold to restore confidence. Once that route is chosen, the critical factor is to set a non-deflationary price for gold that restores confidence, bu